Speeding Through Space

We travel around the Sun at 1000 miles/hour. Our solar system travels around the center of the galaxy at 490,000 miles/hour. The Milky Way, as well as our neighboring galaxies, move 2.25 million miles/hour towards the Great Attractor, 150 million light-years away.

Our path spirals around the sun as it wobbles it's way above and below the Galactic Plane or equator, taking 26,000 years to complete this cycle. This path of our solar system is known as The Ecliptic. We transitioned across the Galactic Plane, into the "northern" hemisphere of the Milky Way, at the end of 2012.

I mention this spirally and wobbling through space, because - and I'm sure I'm not alone here - I didn't know. You know what else I didn't know? That all the visible stars in our night sky are within our galaxy. That fact may be more within "common knowledge," but, regardless, these things are probably not as widely known as they should be. THIS IS OUR HOME! DON'T YOU WANT TO KNOW ABOUT YOU'RE HOME?! Sorry. Again, my understanding of how the hell the stars of, seemingly, unchanging constellations have any sway over our lives is in many ways based on relational distances between everything whirling around out there (in here? around here.). Seeing how varied our celestial paths are, during various ages, helps bring some clarity, at least for me, in beginning to make sense of a 25,000 +/- tradition of paying attention to our surroundings. 

Spiraling like a cyclone. Creating a vortex. Looks like the Double Helix? ...except with more strands? The More-than-Double Helix?   

Spiraling like a cyclone. Creating a vortex. Looks like the Double Helix? ...except with more strands? The More-than-Double Helix?